Thoughts on Building a Different Kind of Home

Many people dream of having a home in the country.  Some people envision a simple, even primitive place to stay while on hunting or fishing expeditions, or as a base from which to engage in such pastimes as hiking, biking or off-roading.  Other people have in mind something more elaborate, perhaps including all the amenities of home.

One thing that is common to both types of visionaries is that many of them would like to emphasize the country ambiance of their place by having it made of log construction.  Nothing says “country” quite like a log cabin!  

If you are having thoughts of such a place for your own, and don’t really intend for it to be your primary residence, or if you want to downsize to a smaller place, you will want to explore small log cabin floor plans.  Whether you are thinking really rustic, with just a few hundred square feet of floor space, or something rather larger, maybe up to about a thousand square feet, it’s essential to make the most of every single square foot.

There are books available of small log cabin floor plans, and they are the perfect place to start your research and planning.  As you peruse these plans, it’s important to keep in mind the particular characteristics of the site on which you intend to build your getaway.  As an example, you’ll want to take into account the north-south alignment on the site, so that you can take maximum advantage of natural heating and cooling.  The availability of power can be an issue in keeping your place comfortable, and you won’t want to have to devote unnecessary time or money to doing so.

The smaller the log cabin, the more you will have to account in your floor plan for shared functions in the available space.  That is, space that is used for waking activities will likely also have to be used for sleeping.  If you have children who go to bed early, try to find a small log cabin floor plan that allows them some room to be separated from adult activities at bed time.  

Another important thing to keep in mind when doing your planning is the need to allow for the free flow of air if you will be heating from a fireplace or stove.  Some log cabin plans assume some kind of forced air or electrical space heating.  If you don’t have that, you may find parts of your country domain unlivable in cold weather.